How to make a ‘medieval style’ possible pouch

Old style bushcraft: a medieval possible pouch

Old style bushcraft: a medieval possible pouch

During the Middle Age was common carrying small items like coins, keys, inside pouches or purses attached to the belt.
There are many archaeological and iconographical documents, you can search for your favorite patterns, but there is a model that in my opinion, is one of the best for a bushcrafter.

By the Late Middle Age, a new type of bag appeared, this pouch was providing an easy way to carry dagger, small swords, knives, in the middle of two belt loops. Below some examples taken from medieval images.

Some medieval pouch patterns

Some medieval pouch patterns

Following this concept you could create your own bushcraft possible pouch and wear it on your knife sheath.
What you need to realize this DIY project? Look at this image.

Tools and materials

Tools and materials

– First of all you need leather, you can buy this in a store, for a better customization prefer vegetable-tanned leather, but you could also… embracing the idea of recycling, search for an unused leather objects (bags, armchairs etc) in a natural colour, and disassembly it (ask your wife before… 🙂 ).

B –  Polyester sewing thread or a natural twine roll.

C – Needles

D – Scissors and a knife, to cut leather.

E – a Fork from your kitchen, you’ll use this as a tool to punch inline holes on the leather.
If you have a fork with no good prongs sharpen these with a small diamond file.

Kitchen fork as an hole punch tool

Kitchen fork as an hole punch tool

I’ve included as jpeg images, two paper models (A4 compatible), feel free to modify anything you want.

wild_tuscany_bushcraft_possible_pouch_front

Front model

wild_tuscany_bushcraft_possible_pouch_rear

Rear model

Cut the pieces following these shapes and after, follow step-by-step these assembly instruction.

Assembly instructions

Assembly instructions

  1. Fold the rear (follow the line on the paper model).
  2. Sew the loops, if you have problems, use this simple stitch, works fine for me
    sewing_the_pouch

    Stitching process

    Place the front side.

  3. Sew the front side and the rear.
  4. Turn the leather upside down to hide the stitching.
  5. Add the flap.
  6. Add the bag closure, you can use a D shaped buckle but also an antler, bone or wood button.

The works is complete!
Carry your survival kit on your belt…and enjoy the Wilderness!

Ciao Mattia

 

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22 thoughts on “How to make a ‘medieval style’ possible pouch

  1. Reblogged this on Paleotool's Weblog and commented:
    Here is a great little instruction set on how to make a European Medieval-style belt bag. You see these on paintings and illustrations on just about every traveler. Not only will you come out with a nice bag but it is a fine and simple introduction into leather working and sewing. All makers need to start somewhere and this might be the right project.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on The Reverend's Big Blog of Leather and commented:
    Reposted here, not for the “medieval style’ pouch because the patterns aren’t sufficiently accurate, but for the use of the table fork as an awl. There’s a number of internal pockets and compartments missing when compared with the originals. Decorate to taste using the back of the butter knife as previously discussed.

    Like

  3. Pingback: How to make a ‘medieval style’ possible pouch | Patrick' s Bushcraft

  4. Pingback: How to take your Mora Classic N.1 to the next bushcraft level | Wild Tuscany Bushcraft

  5. Pingback: Make your own bushcraft leather belt pouch | Wild Tuscany Bushcraft

  6. Pingback: Prometheus, the fire and the bushcrafter | Wild Tuscany Bushcraft

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